5 Open Source Twitter Alternatives For Social Networking

Massive business moves have ripple effects in all kinds of places.

Here at InMotion, we noticed a sudden surge in interest in Mastodon content. Mastodon, a popular federated social media app, can be hosted on virtual private servers and boasts many of the same features as Twitter.

Around the time Elon Musk bought the Twitter social media platform and announced plans for significant changes, some users started looking for alternatives.

Mastodon Popularity Surge 3

The trend suddenly spiked but then fell again. Perhaps legacy Twitter users have recovered from the purchase shock and returned to their favorite apps. Perhaps the searcher found what they were looking for, installed Mastodon, or signed up for an existing instance and left happily. Data doesn’t speak.

Nonetheless, researching alternatives is a great way to learn more about open source software. Below we discuss the pros and cons of Mastodon compared to other open source options.

Here are 5 Twitter alternatives you can consider for your website.

This list isn’t exhaustive, but it’s a good starting point for finding the alternative that best suits your needs.

One. Mastodon

Mastodon is a “federated” open-source microblogging platform that has recently gained popularity as a Twitter alternative. You can post “toot” instead of “tweet”.

Federated apps essentially connect servers and users across vast distributed networks using a variety of protocols and APIs.

What distinguishes Mastodon from Twitter most is its decentralized nature. Twitter (and other large social apps) is a centrally controlled “walled garden,” but decentralized networks lack such control.

This means you have more freedom, but potentially connecting with unsavory users who would otherwise have been banned from Twitter.

But that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t try federated services if you’re interested.

Mastodon allows you to host your own server or join an existing instance. With your own server, you have ultimate control over enforcing your own standards and providing a productive environment for your subscribers.

2. Pleroma

like a mastodon Pleroma Federation is an open-source microblogging app. Likewise, Pleroma offers many of the same Twitter-style networking features, such as activity streams, hashtags, and private messages.

But unlike Twitter, Pleroma boasts a nice live chat feature by default.

In my experience, Pleroma is relatively easy to install and manage.

Even better, Pleroma is generally lighter and more performant than Mastodon, requiring fewer server resources. This means that even cheap VPS cloud servers can work well with Pleroma. Mastodon requires a full stack of Ruby on Rails, NodeJS, and other software, while Pleroma only requires Elixir and PostgreSQL databases.

three. buddy press

that much BuddyPress plugin for WordPress is likely the easiest social network to install. Because WordPress itself is easy to install. BuddyPress also boasts the same social features as the other apps on this list.

Users of BuddyPress can send friend requests, private messages and create groups.

BuddyPress is not federated. This means that user accounts on your WordPress site cannot connect to the larger network. However, a WordPress multisite network allows you to create an almost unlimited number of sites, and users on one node can interact with other sites on that network.

It works like a federated service, but is limited to one WordPress installation. It’s a bit like creating your own walled garden.

Given WordPress’ general user-friendliness, I’d say BuddyPress is the best and simplest way to start a social network. With a wide range of WordPress hosting plans available, you don’t have to spend time configuring a server.

4. Pixelped

United for something completely different Pixelped The app works just like Instagram. You can upload high quality photos and videos and manage your site on your personal server.

It’s not exactly a Twitter alternative, but if your ideal subscribers are more focused on sharing photo and video media than text, you might consider Pixelfed a good option.

Like other decentralized social apps, Pixelfed focuses on privacy and security.

However, most server security and maintenance is your responsibility.

5. email newsletter

The definitive open source Twitter alternative is not a social network, but good old fashioned email.

Everyone still has an email account. WordPress offers a number of email newsletter plugins.

Often emails are sent from third-party networks to offload email management to larger providers. This aspect of the process is usually not open source. However, managing your own email server is very difficult.

Email is less dynamic, but overall it’s simple and provides a direct way to connect with subscribers.

Likewise, your email list can be with you forever and you can bring it to any service you use for years.


These are just a few options for open source social networking apps. Alternative research is a fun way to test open source projects. If you have any questions about these tools, please leave a comment below or contact our live support team.

Source

Massive business moves have ripple effects in all kinds of places.

Here at InMotion, we noticed a sudden surge in interest in Mastodon content. Mastodon, a popular federated social media app, can be hosted on virtual private servers and boasts many of the same features as Twitter.

Around the time Elon Musk bought the Twitter social media platform and announced plans for significant changes, some users started looking for alternatives.

Mastodon Popularity Surge 3

The trend suddenly spiked but then fell again. Perhaps legacy Twitter users have recovered from the purchase shock and returned to their favorite apps. Perhaps the searcher found what they were looking for, installed Mastodon, or signed up for an existing instance and left happily. Data doesn’t speak.

Nonetheless, researching alternatives is a great way to learn more about open source software. Below we discuss the pros and cons of Mastodon compared to other open source options.

Here are 5 Twitter alternatives you can consider for your website.

This list isn’t exhaustive, but it’s a good starting point for finding the alternative that best suits your needs.

One. Mastodon

Mastodon is a “federated” open-source microblogging platform that has recently gained popularity as a Twitter alternative. You can post “toot” instead of “tweet”.

Federated apps essentially connect servers and users across vast distributed networks using a variety of protocols and APIs.

What distinguishes Mastodon from Twitter most is its decentralized nature. Twitter (and other large social apps) is a centrally controlled “walled garden,” but decentralized networks lack such control.

This means you have more freedom, but potentially connecting with unsavory users who would otherwise have been banned from Twitter.

But that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t try federated services if you’re interested.

Mastodon allows you to host your own server or join an existing instance. With your own server, you have ultimate control over enforcing your own standards and providing a productive environment for your subscribers.

2. Pleroma

like a mastodon Pleroma Federation is an open-source microblogging app. Likewise, Pleroma offers many of the same Twitter-style networking features, such as activity streams, hashtags, and private messages.

But unlike Twitter, Pleroma boasts a nice live chat feature by default.

In my experience, Pleroma is relatively easy to install and manage.

Even better, Pleroma is generally lighter and more performant than Mastodon, requiring fewer server resources. This means that even cheap VPS cloud servers can work well with Pleroma. Mastodon requires a full stack of Ruby on Rails, NodeJS, and other software, while Pleroma only requires Elixir and PostgreSQL databases.

three. buddy press

that much BuddyPress plugin for WordPress is likely the easiest social network to install. Because WordPress itself is easy to install. BuddyPress also boasts the same social features as the other apps on this list.

Users of BuddyPress can send friend requests, private messages and create groups.

BuddyPress is not federated. This means that user accounts on your WordPress site cannot connect to the larger network. However, a WordPress multisite network allows you to create an almost unlimited number of sites, and users on one node can interact with other sites on that network.

It works like a federated service, but is limited to one WordPress installation. It’s a bit like creating your own walled garden.

Given WordPress’ general user-friendliness, I’d say BuddyPress is the best and simplest way to start a social network. With a wide range of WordPress hosting plans available, you don’t have to spend time configuring a server.

4. Pixelped

United for something completely different Pixelped The app works just like Instagram. You can upload high quality photos and videos and manage your site on your personal server.

It’s not exactly a Twitter alternative, but if your ideal subscribers are more focused on sharing photo and video media than text, you might consider Pixelfed a good option.

Like other decentralized social apps, Pixelfed focuses on privacy and security.

However, most server security and maintenance is your responsibility.

5. email newsletter

The definitive open source Twitter alternative is not a social network, but good old fashioned email.

Everyone still has an email account. WordPress offers a number of email newsletter plugins.

Often emails are sent from third-party networks to offload email management to larger providers. This aspect of the process is usually not open source. However, managing your own email server is very difficult.

Email is less dynamic, but overall it’s simple and provides a direct way to connect with subscribers.

Likewise, your email list can be with you forever and you can bring it to any service you use for years.


These are just a few options for open source social networking apps. Alternative research is a fun way to test open source projects. If you have any questions about these tools, please leave a comment below or contact our live support team.

Source

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