Plesk with Centralized Database and Network File System

We have received several requests to implement support for centralized databases (DBs) and file storage. These two features are understandable because they open up many convenient hosting deployment scenarios that were previously unavailable or could only be created at your own risk. Additionally, fewer single points of failure (SPOFs) are more tolerant of solution failures. But after Plesk Obsidian 18.0.49 released, centralized DB (beta) and Network File System (NFS) enabled. Let’s see what each feature can do.

If you are only interested in centralized database features ‘Shared or centralized database‘ part time job. However, if you want to find the vhosts file on NFS, skip the information about the database and ‘network file system‘ part time job. You do not have to configure these features together. Each feature can be used as a standalone feature if desired.

Shared or centralized database

Previously, you had to have a database running locally because Plesk uses it to store its own database (called “psa”). Even if you connect an external database for your customer website, you must have a local database service for Plesk. This means maintaining the database, such as installing security updates, making backups, monitoring logs, and increasing disk and other resources for the server as needed. This creates a lot of extra work if you have a lot of Plesk servers. This imposes another serious limitation. You can use only databases that can be installed on your operating system.

But what has changed since Plesk Obsidian 18.0.49? Let’s dig a little deeper to see some new scenarios.

It also has some downsides.

  • If you use a single database for all Plesk servers, the database becomes a single point of failure for all Plesk servers.
  • The network speed and connectivity between the database server and Plesk must be sufficient and reliable.

Deploy a new server

Let’s begin. You cannot convert an existing Plesk installation to Plesk using a remote ‘psa’ database. This should be for new Plesk installations only. I decided to go with Oracle Cloud because of the ARM servers and the attractive free tier terms for those servers.

First, create a private network (“local”, 10.0.0.0/24) so ​​that the traffic between Plesk and the database server goes inside this network. Allow all traffic inside the private network to make network setup easier. As you can see in the image below, some networks have public access (“Internet”).

Source

We have received several requests to implement support for centralized databases (DBs) and file storage. These two features are understandable because they open up many convenient hosting deployment scenarios that were previously unavailable or could only be created at your own risk. Additionally, fewer single points of failure (SPOFs) are more tolerant of solution failures. But after Plesk Obsidian 18.0.49 released, centralized DB (beta) and Network File System (NFS) enabled. Let’s see what each feature can do.

If you are only interested in centralized database features ‘Shared or centralized database‘ part time job. However, if you want to find the vhosts file on NFS, skip the information about the database and ‘network file system‘ part time job. You do not have to configure these features together. Each feature can be used as a standalone feature if desired.

Shared or centralized database

Previously, you had to have a database running locally because Plesk uses it to store its own database (called “psa”). Even if you connect an external database for your customer website, you must have a local database service for Plesk. This means maintaining the database, such as installing security updates, making backups, monitoring logs, and increasing disk and other resources for the server as needed. This creates a lot of extra work if you have a lot of Plesk servers. This imposes another serious limitation. You can use only databases that can be installed on your operating system.

But what has changed since Plesk Obsidian 18.0.49? Let’s dig a little deeper to see some new scenarios.

It also has some downsides.

  • If you use a single database for all Plesk servers, the database becomes a single point of failure for all Plesk servers.
  • The network speed and connectivity between the database server and Plesk must be sufficient and reliable.

Deploy a new server

Let’s begin. You cannot convert an existing Plesk installation to Plesk using a remote ‘psa’ database. This should be for new Plesk installations only. I decided to go with Oracle Cloud because of the ARM servers and the attractive free tier terms for those servers.

First, create a private network (“local”, 10.0.0.0/24) so ​​that the traffic between Plesk and the database server goes inside this network. Allow all traffic inside the private network to make network setup easier. As you can see in the image below, some networks have public access (“Internet”).

Source

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